Equipment Safety


Equipment Safety

All players equipment must meet the safety standards established by Hockey Canada as identified by the CSA approved sticker.  Additionally, equipment must meet the regulations in terms of size and configuration as established by Hockey Canada.

Fitting.  Properly fitting equipment is as critical as having the accepted safety standard in the prevention of injury. While we realize that the cost of hockey equipment makes “buying a bit big” very attractive, there must be an overriding safety concern.  All Team staff officials are mandated to ensure that equipment fits properly throughout the season. Hockey Canada has developed a video to help walk staff officials and parents through proper equipment fit. 

Helmets . Only approved stickers supplied by the helmet manufacturer can be affixed to helmets.  The team must be able to provide proof from the manufacturer that they are approved upon request.

All helmets require ear protection.
All straps must be secured to keep the helmet in place.  (This applies to players and staff)

Cages must be approved type and configuration, identifiable by the CSA sticker.  Please note that the expiry date on the CSA sticker is not applicable in Canada. The Hockey Canada website states that 'the life-span of a hockey helmet is not easy to determine. Many factors, including the amount and type of use, care and maintenance, storage, etc., determine a hockey helmet’s life-span. Consumers should exercise good judgment as to the suitability of a hockey helmet for play. Helmets that are cracked, have loose fitting or missing liner pieces, or that have been subjected to a severe blow should be replaced'.

Goalie Masks.  Goalie masks must be CSA approved. The cage cannot be the pro “cats-eye” type with the large eye wholes.  There is an approved version that has an additional bar to reduce the hole to an approved standard.

Goaltenders are required to wear commercially available neck protectors and throat protectors (commonly referred as "cow catchers") at all levels in the KGHA, unless the goaltender's helmet is equipped with a Type 3 facial protector distinguishable by a blue sticker bearing the CSA certification mark.

Stick Safety.  Regularly check sticks to ensure there are no breaks, chips or cracks in the blade or shaft.  If any of these are found, the stick or blade should be replaced.

Any cuts of a fiberglass stick should be done with a hacksaw and taped to prevent penetration of the skin by any strands and dangerous splintering.

Butt End Safety.  There is the potential that the butt end of a stick might fit through the CSA approved cage if not covered sufficiently.  Hockey Canada Rule 21(a) states that the end of the shaft of all sticks must be covered to protect against injury.  All staffs are to check sticks to ensure that the butt end is sufficiently covered and large enough to prevent penetration of CSA approved cage masks.

Skates. You should always wear socks in your skates. They absorb sweat and helps reduce the spread of bacteria and corrosion of the skate materials.

Do not allow pressure points to blister as it will promote bacteria in the skate and infect the wound. You should apply Vaseline to pressure points as soon as they are noticed and reapply periodically. Cover any blister with moleskin, medical tape or form pads. 

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